I think I could have hit the shot Derek Fisher hit: Where’s the “D”?

Posted by Andy Durham on June 12, 2009 at 10:34 am under Professional | Read the First Comment

It was a long left-haned three-point shot and and it lead the Los Angeles Lakers to the win last night over the Orlando Magic, but you have to ask the question, “Where was the Defense?”

The Lakers’ Derek Fisher nailed it and that last one wasn’t the only big three that Fisher hit last night, but on that last shot, Where was the “D”? The Magic were guarding Fisher like they were protecting against a layup. Get up on the man! If you foul him and he misses, then you make him earn those three points at the foul line.

A straight-away three and where’s the “D”? If you ask me, I didn’t see any “D” and if you give me that three I’ll nail it at least 5 out of 10 times and most of you would too……. Stan Van Gundy has some ‘splaining to do after last night’s loss at the Magic Kingdom.

Was it all Derke Fisher or was it a lack of defense on the part of the Orlando Magic?????

Here’s the story from FOX Sports coming in from the right hand column of our home page.

ORLANDO — Others would have been celebrating the two biggest shots of the postseason’s biggest game. They would have jumping-jacked their way around the floor and looked for someone to hug. But Derek Fisher acted like he’d been in this position before, and it was no act.

As the second of his crucial pair of threes was spinning its way magnetically through the rim, the 34-year-old Fisher withdrew without a sound from the scene of his finishing stroke. His left wrist remained extended as if he wanted the moment to last; he backed away like a painter satisfied with the canvas. He looked across the floor to Kobe Bryant, with whom he joined the Lakers as rookies 13 years ago, and from whom he received the kick-out pass that Fisher caught and shot for the Lakers’ 94-91 advantage with 31.3 seconds remaining in overtime, and all Fisher did was grin. Kobe and the other Lakers were running toward him Thursday and he answered them with a grandfatherly smile.

Fisher was to this 99-91 win in Game 4 of the NBA Finals what Robert Horry(Big Shot Bob) was to the Lakers’ previous championships. He made the shots that not only exploited the pair of mistakes Dwight Howard made but also punished Howard in a most excruciating way.

The difference between Orlando and Los Angeles is as mighty as the Lakers’ 3-1 lead in this series. With 11.1 seconds remaining in regulation and an 87-84 lead to protect for the Magic, Howard needed only to make one of his two free throws. He dribbled the ball, spun it in his hands, took deep breaths and missed them both. He made the easy shots look too difficult, and Fisher made the difficult shots look like he had made them more often than he can remember. Which after all these years is probably true.

“Here’s my thing on experience,” Orlando coach Stan Van Gundy said as he considered the loss. “It’s a basketball game. These guys have played hundreds of them, thousands of them. Most of these guys have been in huge games. It’s just too cliché that it’s all about Finals experience, as if all of a sudden we’re playing with 11-foot baskets and a smaller court or something like that. I don’t buy it.”


  • Bob said,

    I think Dan Van Grondy could have done a better job of coaching the Magic last night.