Mr. Don Stowe was the man to know when you went to the local ballpark

Posted by Andy Durham on November 13, 2009 at 4:19 pm under Amateur, College, High School, Professional | Read the First Comment

He worked with the amateurs, but he was a true professional.

Mr. Don Stowe passed away this week and he worked with the local amateur youth baseball programs for many, many years here in Greensboro.

Mr. Stowe was a man of tactful diplomacy, and he knew how to deal with people and he was the man to know, when you got ready to go to the local ballpark, for a Colt Baseball or other youth baseball events.

He was seen regularly working the gate at Memorial Stadium for Colt Baseball games in the regular season or for All-Star events. He put in a ton of his time trying to help give kids a better opportunity to make something out of themselves and to offer each kid a chance to excel at baseball or anything else that they were good at.

People come and go, but Mr. Stowe, was much like Mr. Cox, the fellow that used to be the principal at Southeast Guilford. These men are your leaders and they come and go, but the thing about them that you remember, is that they tried to do what was right for the entire group of people involved and not just for one or two individuals.

That is the hard part of the equation and leaders like Mr. Stowe and men like Larry Moore knew and still know how to get the most out of the situation at hand and they do what they do, in the best interest of all parties involved…..

We need more men like Mr. Don Stowe on the local scene, fighting for the best interests of the kids that are looking to get a shot to make a difference one day themselves.

Men like Mr. Stowe and Larry Moore and the late Bob Doss make a difference, and the only thing different with the way things are today is that these men are leaving and others are not stepping up to take their place and fill their shoes.

We need more leaders like these men that have served us so well, whether it be on the home front or on the military front and if they don’t step up, we all might end up getting stepped on.

Thanks Mr. Stowe and we hate to see you go, but your son will carry on and he might just be the one who carries your bags from this day on……

from the News and Record at www.news-record.com on Mr. Don Stowe:

He was a veteran of the US Coast Guard serving during World War II. He graduated from Appalachian State Teachers College in 1952 and earned a Master in Education degree from UNCG in 1966.

He began his teaching and coaching career in Lowell. After three years, he moved to Tabor City and then accepted a teaching position at Gibsonville High School in 1954.

Page High School hired him as a teacher and athletic coach the first year they opened in 1958. Donald spent twelve years at Page and served as assistant principal for his last four years. He then spent the next twelve years as principal of Lindley and Gillespie Jr. High Schools. After 31 years in the public school system he taught at GTCC for twelve years.

Mr. Stowe is survived by his wife of 52 years, Madge Roseman Stowe, sons, Donald Stowe, Jr. and wife, Nina, Geoffrey Stowe, grandchildren; Donald L. Stowe, III, Walter R. Stowe, Jacob Stowe, Jaime Stowe, Jeremy Stowe and three great-grandchildren.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Boy Scouts of America, Old North State Council, PO Box 29046, Greensboro, NC 27429 or to Greensboro Youth Baseball, PO Box 9591, Greensboro,

Mr. Don Stowe served Greensboro Youth Baseball well.


  • Brenda DeLauro said,

    Andy, what a nice tribute to Mr. Stowe. I had the privelege of getting to know him and his wife Madge through the years. They would help out at a field when we would have a tournament in Palomino. To them all that matter was boys playing baseball not get caught up on what program it was. You are right we need others to step up for youth baseball in Greensboro. I would like to see former players take an interest in helping out. I wish Colt and Palomino all the best in the future of their programs. I was apart of that for 17 seasons before, moving out here to Kansas City, MO