We have seen a lot of deaths lately and we have two more to deal with:We have lost Dick Enberg and Tom Zenk

Posted by Andy Durham on December 23, 2017 at 11:25 pm under Amateur, College, Professional | Comments are off for this article

Dick Enberg, probably best know for his sports announcing work with NBC Sports and who can forget that college basketball announcing team of Dick Enberg, Billy Packer and Al McGuire…..Dick Enberg on that Saturday night basketball call of UCLA vs. Houston, in what was at that time(around 1970), the ‘College Basketball Game of the Century’…..Enberg was very versatile and he call/announce just any sport and again he really made a real big name for himself by calling UCLA basketball games, back when John Wooden was the, “Wizard of Westwood”…..

Dick Enberg died Thursday from an apparent heart attack…

Let’s look to Wikipedia for their word on Dick Enberg:Richard Alan Enberg (January 9, 1935 – December 21, 2017) was an American sportscaster. He provided play-by-play for various sports on numerous radio and television networks (including NBC, CBS, and ESPN), and for individual teams, over the course of an approximately 60-year career.

Enberg was well known for his signature on-air catchphrases “Touch ’em all” (for home runs) and “Oh, my!” (for particularly exciting and outstanding athletic plays). He also announced or hosted the Tournament of Roses Parade for many years, sometimes with the help of family members. Enberg retired from broadcasting in 2016.

Tom Zenk, as “The Z-Man” and he was part of that Can-Am Connection, along with Rick Martel in the WWF and he earlier made a name for himself in the old AWA….In WCW Tom Zenk found success as a tag-team partner of Brian Pillman and from Wikipedia on Tom Zenk….

Thomas Erwin “Tom” Zenk (November 30, 1958 – December 9, 2017)[1] was an American professional wrestler and bodybuilder. He was best known for his appearances with professional wrestling promotions the World Wrestling Federation and World Championship Wrestling in the late 1980s and early 1990s.


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